DOJ

Kim Foxx steps into her new position with the Chicago police under a federal probe. She promises to make reforms that will end the sense of hopelessness.

The Justice Department is investigating the Tulsa police shooting of an unarmed Black man. They are looking into a possible civil rights violation.

The Department of Justice announced that it will phase out its use of private prisons. There's no need for them with the declining population of federal prisoners.

The Department of Justice and a South Carolina sheriff's department reach an agreement on police involvement in student discipline. Meanwhile the ACLU files a lawsuit against the state's vaguely worded statutes blamed for filling the school to prison pipeline.

A lawsuit accuses 13 St. Louis suburbs of extorting poor Black residents. Attorneys say they're operating debtor's prisons.

The U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday closed a probe prompted by the April 2015 death of Freddie Gray. It concluded Baltimore police officers regularly violate the constitutional rights of Black residents through the use of excessive force, unlawful searches and arrests, and racial discrimination.

A DOJ study reveals that responding to domestic disputes accounts for most fatalities of police. This paints a different picture from the view that there's a war on cops.

Michael Moore, a U.S. attorney based in Macon, launched an investigation into Johnson's death in October of 2013. After Moore left his position, the case was passed to federal prosecutors in Ohio.

A federal grand jury on Wednesday handed up a three-count indictment against former North Charleston, South Carolina police officer Michael Slager in the fatal shooting of Walter Scott on April 4, 2015, according to a statement from Vanita Gupta, head of the Civil Rights Division, and U. S. Attorney Bill Nettles of the District of South […]

The Department of Justice and North Carolina filed lawsuits against each other over the so-called "bathroom bill." North Carolina denies that the measure violates the civil rights of transgender people.

The DOJ sent a letter to state and municipal courts instructing them to stop targeting poor people for profit. This comes in the aftermath of a scathing DOJ report of the Ferguson police and courts that targeted poor blacks for fines.

In a major step in the aftermath of Eric Garner's death, which touched off a nationwide movement against police brutality, federal prosecutors began presenting evidence to a grand jury on Wednesday, reports The New York Times.