Af w/Amos Aug 13, 2015

The Afternoons with Amos PODCAST For Thursday, August 13, 2015. (Interview With Folks From Pogue’s Run Grocery Starts At 1:41 Mark On PODCAST Media Player). Could a grocery store coop be a a solution to the crisis of food deserts and lack of grocery stores with fresh produce and meats in inner city African-American neighborhoods? Afternoons with Amos explored that issue with leaders from Indianapolis’ own neighborhood owned grocery coop.

Af w/Amos Aug 13, 2015

Pogue’s Run Grocery On E 10th Street

It’s Pogue’s Run Grocery located on 10th Street just east of Rural in the Near East Side neighborhood.  The grocery opened nearly five years ago and features Indiana grown products, especially organic and natural foods, without processing or extra additives.  Nate Roberts one of the execs with Pogue’s Run grocery and Alex Roberts one of the managers appeared on Afternoons with Amos to talk about the concept.

Af w/Amos Aug 13, 2015

Nate Roberts, Pogue’s Run Grocery

The coop is organized as a non-profit with individuals or families pay $150 in a one time membership fee.  That fee means they are investors in the coop and they are entitled to discounts on the merchandise.  But the unlike a Sam’s Club or Costco, anyone can come to Pogue’s Run grocery and shop.  Both Roberts and Walker talked about the difficulties of starting a grocery and the sizable upfront investment that must be made.  The stores is in an older building, with but has an airy, welcoming feel.  They take credit cards and food stamps/EBT cards.

Af w/Amos Aug 13, 2015

Alan Walker, Pogue’s Run Grocery

They also have a deli with tables and chairs for folks to eat what they bought and enjoy the ambiance.  Asked if there are any Black-owned grocery coops, Roberts and Walker weren’t sure, but Afternoons with Amos has learned of one being created in Greensboro North Carolina called Renaissance Community Co-op.  It’s difficult and expensive to start, but the folks at Pogues Run Grocery think a grocery coop could work in Black-majority Indy inner city neighborhoods.

Af w/Amos Aug 13, 2015

IPS Board President Diane Arnold

(Interview With IPS Board President Diane Arnold Starts At 51:23 Mark). For the first time in eight years, the IPS School Board has to fill a board vacancy. This time to replace Caitlin Hannon who resigned on August 10th.  IPS Board President Diane Arnold appeared on Afternoons with Amos, along with new Board Administrator Zach Mulholland to explain the process for people to apply to be appointed to Hannon’s board seat.  Applicants must submit a cover letter and resume by Friday, August 21st. Those e-mail submissions must arrive to Zach Mulholland by 5pm. Individuals must live in IPS Board District 1, which includes the east side of Downtown, the Near East Side, Irvington, the neighborhoods around Community Hospital East and Naval Avionics, the area around Twin Aire Shopping Center, neighborhoods along Raymond Street and Bethel Park.  Arnold also talked about the start of IPS’ new school year, the district’s new Student Code of Conduct and the district’s effort to reduce out of school suspensions and expulsions.  Arnold also talked about the fall debut of IPS Strategic Plan, which Arnold says will include a new effort to engage parents of IPS students and took questions and concerns about IPS from listeners.  Those eligible and interested in applying for the vacant IPS Board seat should click the Link: LINK TO APPLY FOR IPS SCHOOL BOARD VACANCY  (Amos Reading The Community Open Letter On Aftermath Of Andre Green’s Death Starts At 37:44 Mark On Media Player). Finally Amos read the text of an open letter to the community endorsed by a number of Indianapolis community leaders in the wake of the deadly police action shooting of Andre Green.  Here’s the text of the Letter:  “Our community laments the variety of circumstances that led to the death of Andre Green. Our prayers extend to his family, the victim(s) of the alleged carjacking and the law enforcement officers involved in the recent events. We encourage a complete, timely and thorough investigation so that justice and understanding may prevail.

We understand and feel the frustration the entire community feels at times like this. Despite sharing a deep and profound sense of grief, anger and concern regarding the various issues that impact our city, we stand to affirm our commitment to healing our community, enriching the lives of our residents and guests and promoting standards and values that build competence and confidence. To that end we call and will work for the following: * increased public awareness of the various processes that exist, or need to exist, relating to use of force and law enforcement protocols. * acquisition of dash and body cameras and the establishment of appropriate policy, procedures and controls therein for the protection of civilians and law enforcement personnel. * increased awareness of the number of and access to unlicensed firearms among and impacting youth and address the degree this access is aided and abetted by adults. * increased capacity and vigilance to focus energy and resources on family support and strengthening and to address the health, educational, economic, social and political variables that negatively impact the lives of residents and guests. We recognize that law enforcement officers are not infallible and we encourage the community to avoid divisive and ruinous type of reactions (on all sides) to the challenges we and other cities face. Additionally, we salute current leadership at IMPD for their commitment to dialogue, partnership and to justice within and outside of the department. We call for the Mayor, City Council leadership and all candidates for elected office to support and work for the acquisition of body and dash cams and the tools and policies/procedures that can promote confidence among law enforcement and the civilians they serve. Finally, we encourage the seasoned and emerging generation of community leadership to intentionally and forcefully engage your spheres of influence in dialogue about the issues raised by incidents like this with the resolve to support the recommendations herein and to promote a peaceful and thriving community we all call home.” Signed: Tony Mason, CEO, Indianapolis Urban League; James Garrett Jr., Executive Director, Indiana Commission on the Social Status of Black Males; Nuri Muhammad, Minister, Nation of Islam; Mikal Saahir, Imam, Nur Allah Islamic Center;Marshawn Wolley, President, Indianapolis Urban League Young Professionals; Leroy Wadlington, Pastor, Pilgrim Baptist Church; Dr. David Hampton, Senior Pastor,  Light of the World Christian Church; Dr. Preston Adams, Senior Pastor, Amazing Grace Christian Church, Kenya Turner; The Men of Iota Phi Theta Fraternity Inc., Alpha Phi Omega Indianapolis Alumni; Waters Miller Group; Micheal Jones, Senior Pastor, Progressive Missionary Baptist Church; Tim Nation, Peace Learning Center. The Afternoons with Amos PODCAST For Thursday, August 13, 2015 Runs 97 Minutes. ©2015 WTLC/Radio One. PODCAST Starts After Brief Video Ad.  [theplatform account=”BCY3OC” media=”LdbG7rV_BLJ_” player=”xFJXq1diB1tB”]